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Posts Tagged ‘Egypt’

Rep. Allen West recently gave an awesome speech to the Center for Security Policy.

While it seems that our media can only focus on one “crisis” at a time, Allen West never takes his eye off of all the threats to U.S. national security.

No teleprompter, you’ll notice. The man is a walking encyclopedia, and he can communicate.

What Paul Ryan does for budget issues, Allen West does for national security.

Hat Tip: Big Peace

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“Judenrein” was the ghastly word used by the Nazis to describe areas “cleansed” of all Jews.

It appears that there is a large and active contingent of people in the Middle East who would like to make it “Christenrein” — rid of all Christians. Catholic News Service describes the ongoing nightmare:

An Iraqi archbishop spoke of “near-genocide conditions” for Christians in his country and said those fleeing violence were straining resources in other parts of the country.Archbishop Bashar Warda of Irbil, Iraq, said part of the problem was the country’s “weak constitution, which tries to please two masters.”

“We are living in a region which cannot decide if it is for democracy or Islamic law,” he said March 16 at news conference sponsored by the Catholic charitable agency Aid to the Church in Need.

Archbishop Warda criticized “neighboring governments feeding insurgents with money and weapons to destabilize the Iraqi government” and said the rest of world’s governments had “turned their backs on us, as if the human rights abuses and near-genocide conditions Iraqi Christians experience are temporary.”

Archbishop Warda said that since the U.S.-led occupation of his country began in 2003, more than 500 Christians had been killed in religious and politically motivated violence.

Between 2006 and 2010, 17 Iraqi priests and two bishops were kidnapped and beaten or tortured. One bishop, four priests and three subdeacons were killed.

“In most cases, those responsible for the crimes stated they wanted Christians out of Iraq,” the archbishop said.

Referring to the “systematic bombing campaign of Iraqi churches,” he said 66 churches had been attacked or bombed; in addition, two convents, one monastery and a church orphanage also were bombed.

Iraq’s Christian population has dropped by more than 60 percent in the last 20 years, from approximately 1.4 million then to about 500,000 now — and even that figure is “highly optimistic,” according to the archbishop.

“The past is terrifying, the present is not promising, so everything is telling us that there is no future for Christians,” Archbishop Warda later told Catholic News Service.

Describing the situation in the Middle East as “boiling,” he said Christians in the region “expect another war” due to the instability in so many countries and the ongoing tensions between Shiite and Sunni Muslims.

“In many countries, the situation for Christians seems to be worsening, sometimes to the point that we wonder if we will survive,” he said. He added that the place of Christians as one of the original inhabitants of the Middle East had been “wiped from collective memory.”

The Chaldean Christians of Iraq are one of the oldest continuous Christian communities in the world, having common roots with the Assyrian Church of the East, which dates back to the 1st century A.D.

The Christian community in Egypt also dates back to the 1st century A.D. Tradition has it that St. Mark the evangelist was the first to preach the Gospel in Alexandria and founded the church there during the reign of Roman emperor Claudius, around 42 A.D. This ancient Christian community has been persecuted ever since Muslim armies swept through North Africa in the seventh century — but persecution has worsened since the downfall of Mubarak.

I wrote here several weeks ago about Egyptian Army violence against several communities of Christian monks. In that post, I expressed bewilderment as to why the Army, as opposed to the Muslim Brotherhood, would be attacking unarmed Christians. Many Christians, both here and in Egypt, had hoped that the Army might stand between Christians and the Muslim Brotherhood.  We were dreaming. From the Pakistan Christian Post:

There is now no doubt there is an unholy alliance between the military and the radical Muslim Brotherhood. It has become crystal clear that the young, educated secular activists who initially propelled the non-ideological revolution are no longer the driving political force. The Muslim Brotherhood with its link to the military is now dictating the future destiny of Egypt.

The hopes and aspirations of the young protestors, that the country would embrace secular democracy after the fall of the dictator Hosni Mubarak, suffered a major setback as the country went to the polls last week to vote on constitutional changes.

The proposed constitutional amendments put to the vote [on March 19] largely dealt with the articles of the 1971 constitution pertaining to presidential elections and the president’s term in office. The changes made no mention of the notorious Article 2, which states that “Islam is the religion of the State, Arabic is its official language, and the principal source of legislation is Islamic Jurisprudence (Shariah).”

The imposition of Article 2 on the debate was for the most part the handiwork of a treaty between the Salafist movement and the Muslim Brotherhood. While the Muslim Brotherhood control the political front, the Salafist movement has become its muscle on the street, they prohibit any political opposition to a Muslim ruler. Salafists hold strict and literalist interpretations of Islamic doctrine; they advocate the full veil and open hostility with non-Muslims, particularly Egypt’s large Coptic Christian community, estimated at some 10 million. They used anti-Coptic incitement to sway the referendum. Muslim Brotherhood and Salafist’s were among the fiercest advocates of the “Yes” vote, declaring it a religious duty for all Muslims. “No” campaigners were portrayed as Christian and secularists “enemies of Islam”. Rather than confront the radicals, the majority of eligible voters abstained with only 41% of potential voters turning out for the referendum.

Pamphlets and advertisements were published, “It is ‘un-Islamic’ to vote “No”, this angered the youth who asserted, “that Islamists and Salafists were pushing their agendas through religious manipulation instead of political participation, this is our revolution and we will protest again.”

Upon the declaration from the youth, the Brotherhood quickly swung into action, to prevent further protests and demands for a new referendum on the constitution. The ruling military approved a law banning and criminalizing any future strikes, protests, marches or rallies in the country.

Not only is the Army cracking down on protesters, they made it a point — in true shariah fashion — to particularly target female protesters, as reported by human rights group Amnesty International. From Elder of Ziyon:

After army officers violently cleared the square of protesters on 9 March, at least 18 women were held in military detention. Amnesty International has been told by women protesters that they were beaten, given electric shocks, subjected to strip searches while being photographed by male soldiers, then forced to submit to ‘virginity checks’ and threatened with prostitution charges.

‘Virginity tests’ are a form of torture when they are forced or coerced.

…According to information received by Amnesty International, one woman who said she was a virgin but whose test supposedly proved otherwise was beaten and given electric shocks.

Since shariah requires violence against women, I guess we shouldn’t be surprised. What did surprise me was how quickly the Egyptian Army has moved to appoint itself the enforcer of shariah law.

And since shariah also requires persecution of non-Muslims, it was only a matter of time (but how short a time!) before we started seeing stories such as this one, from International Christian Concern’s blog Persecution.org:

Christian protestors who staged a nine-day sit-in calling for the rebuilding of a church torched by Islamists have come under attack by the Egyptian army.

According to a news release from Barnabas Aid, the demonstrators were reportedly shot at and struck with electric batons outside the state television headquarters in Maspero, downtown Cairo. Fifteen suffered injuries, including broken limbs, head wounds and burns.

The assault happened in the early hours of March 14 – two hours before an agreed suspension of the sit-in. Representatives of the demonstrators had met with Egyptian Prime Minister Essam Sharaf and members of the military council the previous afternoon to discuss their demands.

Barnabas Aid reported the army has said it will rebuild the church in Soul, which was destroyed on March 5. The demonstrators agreed to suspend the sit-in until March 25 to give the government time to fulfill its pledges.

Around 500 people were still at the site when military forces smashed the demonstration in the early morning hours. Barnabas Aid reported one of the organizers said the soldiers cut the wire fences and started running towards the people, shouting the Islamic war cry “Allahu Akhbar” (“god is great.”)

Thousands of Christians took to the streets of Cairo last week in protest over the attack on the village of Soul, 30 km from the capital, where Christian homes were targeted and the church destroyed by a mob of nearly 4,000 Muslims.

Barnabas Aid said on the evening of March 8, a Muslim mob attacked the Christian demonstrators around Mokattam [a garbage-collectors’ village; see my post about this inspiring community here], resulting in deadly clashes. Thirteen people were killed and 140 wounded. Witnesses have since said that they saw people being killed by the army, who were firing shots apparently to control the riots.

Every day that goes by demonstrates a little more how mistaken we were to think that the Egyptian Army would be independent of the Muslim Brotherhood, much less a restraining influence on them.

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From the Wall Street Journal:

The U.S. has lost track of many former Guantanamo detainees who had been sent home to the Middle East and North Africa, a sign that unrest in the region is disrupting critical terror-fighting relationships America has built up since the Sept. 11 attacks, U.S. officials say.

The flow of information from Libya, Yemen and other governments in the region about the whereabouts and activities of the former Guantanamo detainees, along with other Islamists released from local prisons, has slowed or even stopped, the officials say. U.S. officials say they fear that former detainees will re-join al Qaeda and other Islamist groups.

…For nearly a decade, the U.S. has conducted a major cloak-and-missile campaign against al Qaeda, teaming up with friendly Arab leaders to swap intelligence, interrogate suspects, train commandos or carry out military strikes from Morocco to Iraq. The value of these partnerships was evident last fall when Saudi Arabia tipped off U.S. and European intelligence agencies about an imminent plot to blow up U.S.-bound cargo planes by al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula, the terror group’s affiliate in Yemen.

Al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula's leadership. Two of the four are former Guantanamo detainees.

Now popular movements sweeping the region have knocked some counterterrorism allies from power, and left others too distracted or politically vulnerable to risk open cooperation with the U.S. 

Intelligence-sharing has already slowed in some areas as the U.S. struggles to identify reliable counterparts in reshuffled governments.

“It’s difficult to share information when you don’t know who the players are,” said another U.S. official.

The upheaval has upended U.S. foreign policy in the region, with old friends shaken or gone and the allegiance of emerging leaders uncertain. The effects on counterterrorism efforts are one of the aftershocks that worry the intelligence community the most.

…In Yemen, U.S. and European officials are increasingly concerned that former Guantanamo detainees are no longer under much, if any, government surveillance. At the same time, they have detected an uptick in activity by al Qaeda in the Arabian Peninsula. Another senior counterterrorism official said the group is “very actively” plotting new strikes against the U.S. during the lull in American and Yemeni counterterrorism operations. Military strikes by American fighter jets and cruise missiles have been on hold since last May. The current unrest means Yemen is unlikely to allow them to resume anytime soon.

The fear, according to senior U.S. officials, is that al Qaeda plots that would normally be thwarted could now slip through the intelligence-collection cracks.

Read the whole thing.

Hat tip: Weasel Zippers

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Allen West and other people who know anything at all about on-the-ground reality in the Arab Muslim world have been warning us that, once Mubarak was gone, radical Islamists would almost certainly try to take advantage of the situation in Egypt. Despite the valid democratic and human-rights aspirations of many of the Egyptian protesters — and despite how wonderful it is to see people in places like Libya rising up and rejecting dictators who’ve been in place for decades — it’s a fact that the Muslim Brotherhood, like any other group bent on world domination, looks for opportunities. And political upheaval of any sort always presents opportunities.

In Egypt, the Muslim Brotherhood is a long way from officially running things, but the hero’s welcome given to Qaradawi a week ago couldn’t help but disconcert all of us who are old enough to remember quite vividly a similarly triumphal return made by Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini to Iran 32 years ago. Sure enough, radical Islamism — which involves, by definition, the persecution of Christians and Jews — is already rearing its ugly head in Egypt. From AINA, via CrossMuslims:

Egyptian armed forces this week demolished fences surrounding ancient Coptic monasteries, leaving them vulnerable to attacks by armed Arabs, robbers and escaped prisoners, who have seized the opportunity of… diminished protection by the authorities in Egypt to carry out assaults and thefts. “Three monasteries have been attacked by outlaws and have asked for protection from the armed forces, but were told to defend themselves.” said activist Mark Ebeid. “When the terrified monks built fences to protect themselves, armed forces appeared only then with bulldozers to demolish the fences. [!] It is worth noting that these monasteries are among the most ancient in Egypt [dating to several centuries before Muhammad was even born — ed.] with valuable Coptic icons and manuscripts among others, which are of tremendous value to collectors.”

On Sunday February 20, armed forces stormed the 4th century monastery of St. Boula in the Red Sea area, assaulted three monks and then demolished a small fence supporting a gate leading to the fenceless monastery. “The idea of the erection of the gate was prompted after being attacked at midnight on February 13 by five prisoners who [had] broken out from their prisons,” said Father Botros Anba Boula, “and were armed with a pistol and batons….

Father Botros said after this incident they thought the best solution to secure the monastery was to erect a gate with a small fence of 40 meters long at the entrance of a long wiry road leading to the monastery, which would be guarded day and night by the monks, and advised the army of their plan. According to Father Boulos, the army came with armored vehicles to demolish the gate, but it was agreed the monastery itself would undertake the demolition of the gate in stages as army protection is reinstated. “We told the Colonel it would look ugly to the outside world if Egyptian army is demolishing a gate erected for the protection of the unarmed monks under the present absence of security forces. We gave them full hospitality but we had a feeling that they wanted to demolish the gate in a ‘devious’ way.”

On Saturday morning, seeing that only three old monks were guarding the gate, the army returned. “When the army found that very few monks were present, the soldiers, who were hiding in military vans, came out,” said Father Botros, “bound the three monks, threw them to the ground and confiscated their mobile phones so as not to photograph the incident.”

The monks were set free after the gate and the 40 meter fence were demolished.” Only four soldiers were left to guard the huge monastery.

“The army was here not to protect the monastery as they claimed, but to carry out their agenda of demolishing the gate,” said Father Botros to activist Ramy Kamel of ‘Theban Legion’ Coptic advocacy. “By removing the gate and the supporting small fence, the army is giving a message of encouragement to any thief or thug to break into the monastery.”

The St. Bishoy monastery is also under attack. More from AINA, via Weasel Zippers:

For the second time in as many days, Egyptian armed force stormed the 5th century old St. Bishoy monastery in Wadi el-Natroun, 110 kilometers from Cairo. Live ammunition was fired, wounding two monks and six Coptic monastery workers. Several sources confirmed the army’s use of RPG ammunition. Four people have been arrested including three monks and a Coptic lawyer who was at the monastery investigating yesterday’s army attack. [Why are the victims being arrested?! – ed.] Monk Aksios Ava Bishoy told activist Nader Shoukry of Freecopts the armed forces stormed the main entrance gate to the monastery in the morning using five tanks, armored vehicles and a bulldozer to demolish the fence built by the monastery last month to protect themselves and the monastery from the lawlessness which prevailed in Egypt during the January 25 Uprising.

“When we tried to address them, the army fired live bullets, wounding Father Feltaows in the leg and Father Barnabas in the abdomen,” said Monk Ava Bishoy. “Six Coptic workers in the monastery were also injured, some with serious injuries to the chest.”

The injured were rushed to the nearby Sadat Hospital, the ones in serious condition were transferred to the Anglo-Egyptian Hospital in Cairo.

Father Hemanot Ava Bishoy said the army fired live ammunition and RPGs continuously for 30 minutes, which hit part of the ancient fence inside the monastery. “The army was shocked to see the monks standing there praying ‘Lord have mercy’ without running away. This is what really upset them,” he said. “As the soldiers were demolishing the gate and the fence they were chanting ‘Allahu Akbar’ and ‘Victory, Victory’.”

A particularly cruel twist is that the army wouldn’t even let the monastery’s car out for the monks to take the injured to the hospital.

AINA reporter Mary Abdelmassih goes on to describe attacks on yet a third monastery:

The army also attacked the Monastery of St. Makarios of Alexandria in Wady el-Rayan, Fayoum, 100 km from Cairo. It stormed the monastery and fired live ammunition on the monks. Father Mina said that one monk was shot and more than ten have injuries caused by being beaten with batons. The army demolished the newly erected fence and one room from the actual monastery and confiscated building materials. The monastery had also built a fence to protect itself after January 25 and after being attacked by armed Arabs and robbers leading to the injury of six monks, including one monk in critical condition who is still hospitalized.

Frankly, I don’t know what it means that the Egyptian army — not the Muslim Brotherhood, but the army — is conducting these vicious attacks against unarmed Christian monks.

Whatever the explanation, it obviously does not bode well for Christians in Egypt.

In Cairo, Christians did their best to show solidarity with the monks:

Nearly 7000 Copts staged a peaceful rally in front of the Coptic Cathedral in Cairo, where Pope Shenouda III was giving his weekly lecture… after which they marched towards Tahrir Square to protest the armed forces attacks on Coptic monasteries.

Don’t expect much coverage of these events  from the drive-by media, which have already decided that the narrative in Egypt is… a new era of tolerance and human rights! Freedom and diversity! Kumbaya and “Coexist”! Peace, love and flowers!

They’re not going to let any historical facts about Islam — nor any hard facts on the ground today — get in the way of that narrative.

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Yusuf al-Qaradawi, spiritual leader of the Muslim Brotherhood and the most influential Muslim scholar in the world — looked to by most of the world’s Sunni Muslims for guidance about their faith — has made a triumphal return to Egypt. Qaradawi spoke Friday to hundreds of thousands (estimates go as high as a million) of cheering supporters in Tahrir Square, which has been the center of the Cairo protests. Over the decades, Qaradawi has inspired countless radical Muslims including, although he officially renounces them, Osama bin Laden and al-Qaeda. From the Investigative Project on Terrorism:

Qaradawi, who has lived in Qatar since 1961, was a vocal critic of deposed Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak. A profile this week in Germany’s Der Spiegel called him the Muslim Brotherhood’s “father figure”….

It won’t be the first time Qaradawi has been back to Egypt, but his visits have been fleeting. A sermon from him on the first Friday after Mubarak’s ouster could be hugely symbolic as the Brotherhood tries to exert influence over the direction Egyptian society takes. And it will trigger memories of the 1979 Iranian revolution, which took a dramatic turn when Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini returned from exile in France….

The Der Spiegel profile notes Qaradawi’s enigmatic nature. Hailed as a moderate for opposing al-Qaida and embracing modern technology, he has called on Allah to kill “the Jewish Zionists” and spoken “about the right of Palestinian women to blow themselves up.” He has been barred from entering the U.S. since 1999, the profile said.

In the past two years, he also has:

  • Called on Muslims to acquire nuclear weapons “to terrorize their enemies.”
  • Called jihad an Islamic moral duty and said Muslims are permitted to kill Israeli women because they serve in the army.
  • Affirmed his support for suicide bombings. “I supported martyrdom operations,” he said, according to a translation by the Middle East Media Research Institute (MEMRI). “This is a necessary thing, as I told them in London. Give the Palestinians tanks, airplanes, and missiles, and they won’t carry out martyrdom operations. They are forced to turn themselves into human bombs, in order to defend their land, their honor, and their homeland.”
  • Called the Holocaust a divine punishment of Jews “for their corruption. The last punishment was carried out by Hitler. By means of all the things he did to them – even though they exaggerated this issue – he managed to put them in their place. This was divine punishment for them. Allah willing, the next time will be at the hands of the believers.”
  • Prayed for the opportunity to kill a Jew before his death. “The only thing that I hope for is that as my life approaches its end, Allah will give me an opportunity to go to the land of Jihad and resistance, even if in a wheelchair. I will shoot Allah’s enemies, the Jews, and they will throw a bomb at me, and thus, I will seal my life with martyrdom. Praise be to Allah.”

According to MEMRI, Qaradawi gave his followers some red meat about Israel on Friday:

In a special mention of the Palestinian issue, Al-Qaradhawi asked the Egyptian army to open wide the Rafah crossing and to pray for the re-conquest of Jerusalem by the Muslims, so that he and the Muslims could pray in security at Al-Aqsa Mosque. This part of his sermon was cheered and applauded by the crowd. [emphasis added]

Gates of Vienna opines:

Remember, this is what the Ikhwan [Muslim Brotherhood] says before it’s in power, before it has its Islamist hands on the levers of state control, before it can command the police or the army.

What do you think the Egyptian situation will look like this time next year? Or in five years’ time?

Hundreds of thousands gather to celebrate the 1-week anniversary of the fall of Hosni Mubarak -- and to join in Friday prayers led by Sheikh al-Qaradawi.

Well, whatever it looks like, the United States will have helped to get it there, according to this news from Reuters:

The United States will spend $150 million to assist Egypt’s democratic transformation after the ouster of President Hosni Mubarak, Secretary of State Hillary Clinton said on Thursday. “It’s very clear that there’s a great deal of work ahead to ensure an orderly, democratic transition. It’s also clear that Egypt will be grappling with immediate and long-term economic challenges,” Clinton told reporters after briefing lawmakers on Capitol Hill.

“I’m pleased to announce today we will be reprogramming $150 million for Egypt to put ourselves in a position to support the transition there and assist with their economic recovery,” Clinton said….

Clinton said Bill Burns, the under-secretary of State for political affairs, and David Lipton, a White House adviser on international economic affairs, would travel to Egypt next week to consult with various stakeholders on how too use the funds.

“Various stakeholders”? Does anyone seriously think that those won’t include the Muslim Brotherhood radicals who’ve been meeting for over a year with Obama’s good friends Bill Ayers (co-founder of the Weather Underground communist terrorist group) and Jodie Evans (leader of Code Pink, which has met with the Taliban and aided terrorists in Iraq)?


As for the $150 million, “funds” is just another word for “money extracted by force from U.S. citizens” — i.e., our tax dollars at work. It’s what Barack Obama likes to call an “investment.” Do you suppose the Muslim Brotherhood will remember to thank us?

Of course, we’ve been giving money to Egypt for decades, but that was when Egypt was an ally of both the U.S. and Israel. According to the Washington Times,

The U.S. armed forces are entwined with Egypt’s military more than with any other Arab country’s. But if Islamists seize Cairo, as the mullahs captured Tehran, this complex relationship unravels.

“Let me count the ways,” said Ken Allard, a retired Army colonel and military analyst. “They are our biggest strategic partner in the Middle East. At that point, you’ve lost your biggest Arab partner. Geostrategically, the mind boggles.”

The U.S. Navy would not be able to use the Egyptian-run Suez Canal. The 150-year-old waterway sharply reduces sailing time for Atlantic-based carriers and other warships going from the Mediterranean to the Red Sea and Persian Gulf, and to wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

The Air Force likely would lose overflight rights into the Middle East, and the Army would lose a partner in building the M1A1 tank….

The U.S. also has been working with Egyptian forces to stop the smuggling of arms into the Hamas-controlled Gaza Strip.

A Cairo run by Islamists likely would end such operations and develop close ties with Hamas, a U.S.-designated terrorist group that calls for the destruction of Israel….

The CIA, too, would lose a valuable partner. It operates a robust station at the U.S. Embassy as well as classified bases. The [U.S. and Egyptian] governments exchange information on terrorism suspects….

One of the first acts by Muslim Brotherhood [sympathizers] in the current crisis was to storm prisons and release accused terrorists, some of whom belong to Hamas.

“The biggest threat is that rather than having an ally in Mubarak, who has helped keep a lid on radical jihadists in Egypt at this pivotal crossroads, you may have a government that facilitates radical jihadists throughout the region and as a potential export location to other parts of the world, primarily into Europe,” said [Rep. Pete] Hoekstra [of the House Select Committee on Intelligence].

Thanks in large part to U.S. military aid (approximately $1.3 billion a year), Egypt’s armed forces are the largest in Africa, the largest of any Arab country, and the 10th-largest in the world. All of which could fall into the hands of the Muslim Brotherhood — soon.

If it does, you can thank Jeremiah Wright’s most famous disciple, the man that Jew-hater extraordinaire Louis Farrakhan once described as the “Messiah.”

Hat tip:  Infidel Bloggers Alliance

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Victor Davis Hanson is always worth reading, and I’ve linked to him before on this site.  One of the great things about Pajamas Media, where he blogs, is the caliber of commenters it attracts.  In a comment thread on one of Hanson’s recent articles, a person who goes by “ETAB” gave one of the most brilliant analyses of the situation in Egypt — and other Muslim countries — that I have ever come across:

The key variables that must be considered [with respect to Egypt] and that are, strangely, ignored, are: population, economic structure and political structure. These are entangled.

The Egyptian population has exponentially doubled from 40 to 80 million since 1970. But the economic and political structure has remained the same: a two-class (tribal) one of Rulers and Ruled.

This has operated as a statist economy made up of massive public institutions (the Suez Canal, the bureaucracy, all services) which functions as a public ‘redistribution’ of income to subsidize and serve the people. The problem is that such an economy does not generate enough wealth to support such a population growth; the result is that the majority of the population live in poverty, [and] there is enormous unemployment (you get a job with the state bureaucracy only if you know someone, have family there or can bribe someone).

There is no middle class, that is, a sector of the population engaged in private capitalist small- and medium-size businesses which would support this increased population.

And – the political system doesn’t enable a middle class to emerge, to take power (via democracy). Result? Unrest – and Mubarak has taken to brutal means to repress the people, outlaw all opposition parties, reject a free press, intimidate and coerce submission.

[T]he most impoverished turn to ‘magical solutions’ or the utopian dreams of fanaticism, Islamic fascism, which promises that IF only you are pure, THEN, everything will be OK. Unfortunately, utopianism is an activity confined to the imagination and cannot set up private businesses or run a country.

Mubarak has enabled the appearance of ‘magical solutions’ by his refusal to acknowledge that a statist economy cannot support 80 million people. We in the West, with our support for him, have enabled him to maintain power and repress the people. It can’t last. You can’t have those three systems — population, economic and political mode — ‘out of sync’ with each other.

Further down in the thread, “ETAB” confirms his thesis by contrasting the Middle East with China and India:

Both those regions [China and India] had [until recent decades] the same situations [as the Middle Eastern Muslim countries]:  massive population growth in a short period of time; out-of-date economic systems operating in the old two-class rural statist structure;  and political systems that of course, privileged the Old Elites. That left the majority of the population totally out of the economic and political picture.

But – China and India did things differently. They enabled the emergence and robust strength of an economic middle class – of private small- and medium-size businesses. This capitalist economy took over the well-being of that increased population. India has moved on to politically empower this increasing ratio of the population within democracy. China will, in its time, have to do the same. Neither nation is ‘out of the woods’ yet for there is still a strong rural/urban imbalance – but there is no comparison with the decay and entrapment of the Middle East.

The Middle East moved down a dead-end road; it retained that old statist two-class economic and political system. Why and How? Because it had oil..and could subsidize the emerging population and keep it quiet. Up to a point.

Then it went down another road as the population began to increase even more; the Middle East moved into repressive tactics. Military repression in Iraq, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Iran. And the most brutal repression – theocracy – for you cannot argue with the inarguable axioms of ‘god says so’.

Now, the population pressures have reached a critical threshold. The statist economic mode of public industries and employment simply cannot generate the wealth to maintain this massive population. And, the repressive measures are no longer viable – for the electronic communication systems allow the people to see that things are very different in other parts of the world. So, the whole thing starts to crack – that tectonic shift…

The Middle East can’t repress this enormous change. I don’t think that Islamic fascism will continue in any strength when this region enables a middle class to emerge into economic strength. So, the way to combat fascism is not to maintain the old dictatorships – for that actually is the breeding ground for fascism. The way to combat Islamic fascism is to enable the growth of a middle class capitalism.

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Yes, America, it’s deliberate.

Victor Sharpe has written a breathtakingly brilliant analysis at American Thinker:

Not content with creating havoc in the U.S. economy, setting Americans against each other, and forcing through a health reform act which has nothing to do with health but everything to do with the redistribution of wealth and an immense increase in governmental interference, our president has now opened a Pandora’s Box in the Middle East.  It may well usher in a catastrophe not seen since World War 2.

From his notorious Cairo speech to the present, President Obama speaks, and disaster follows.  Some commentators believe that President Obama and Secretary of State Clinton are so utterly naïve as to make themselves unable to understand what will happen in Egypt as a result of their undermining of the Mubarak regime.

The question is justifiably asked: Do they truly believe that the next regime that comes to power will have the interests of the U.S. and the West at heart?

My fear is that Obama is not naïve at all, but he instead knows only too well what he is doing, for he is eagerly promoting Islamic power in the world while diminishing the West and Israel, however much innocent blood will flow as a result.

Inevitably, sooner or later, the Muslim Brotherhood will take power, usher in a barbaric Islamist power in Egypt that will control the Suez Canal, and show no mercy to its own people or its perceived foes.

So now we see what the present incumbent in the White House has wrought, and so can our few remaining allies.  They must now wonder what confidence they can ever have in any future alliance with the United States.

We should be aware of what endemic Islamic violence has wrought in the past.  For example, assassinations of Arab leaders are not an infrequent occurrence.  After the 1948 Arab-Israel War, the King of Jordan, Abdullah, was murdered by followers of the Muslim fanatic, the Mufti of Jerusalem.

The Egyptian prime minister, Nokrashi Pasha, was also struck down.  The forces behind the killings were elements of both Arab socialist movements and the Muslim Brotherhood.  Today, in the streets of Cairo, we have an unholy alliance of the current radical left with the same Muslim Brotherhood.

The Suez Canal is a major lifeline for the economies of Europe and the United States.  It has been the source of political disruption in the past, as it may well be in the near future. And the Muslim Brotherhood may soon control it. As always, the past is our guidepost to the future.

In 1952, Gamal Abdul Nasser seized control of the Egyptian state and forged an alliance with the Soviet Union, which provided enormous arms shipments to Egypt.

Feeling greatly empowered, Nasser broke both the 1949 Armistice Agreement with Israel and international law by blocking the Suez Canal to Israeli ships and other vessels bringing cargoes to and from the Jewish state.  At the same time, Nasser blockaded the narrow Straits of Tiran at the foot of the Sinai peninsula, thus preventing Israeli maritime trade with the Far East and Africa.

Critical chokepoints in flow of oil from the Middle East to the rest of the world: Orange shows the Suez Canal; black shows the Bab al-Mandeb; purple shows the Straits of Hormuz, where the Persian Gulf feeds out to the Gulf of Oman. The red oval shows the Straits of Tiran, on which Israel depends for access to Africa and the Far East.

Nasser eventually nationalized the Suez Canal on July 27, 1956.  This illegal act threatened the oil supplies to Britain and France from the Middle East.  The economic stranglehold on Israel became intolerable, and Arab terrorism against the Jewish state led to many Israeli civilian deaths.  (Incidentally, Arab terrorism began long before the so-called Israeli “occupation,” which Arab and pro-Arab propagandists now use as the excuse for present Arab aggression against Israel.)

In October 1956, war by Britain, France, and Israel against Egypt broke out.  Israeli forces, in what became known as the One Hundred Hours War, defeated the Egyptians in Sinai and Gaza and broke the naval blockade.  Britain and France invaded the Canal Zone to end Nasser’s blockade of the Suez Canal.

Under U.S. Secretary of State John Foster Dulles, Britain and France were eventually forced out of Egypt.  This was, as future events showed, a dreadful blunder on the part of the Eisenhower administration.  It was the beginning of Britain’s decline as a world power.  It also led to Nasser remaining in power.

The Egyptian dictator’s political and pan-Arab ambitions again climaxed in 1967.  Nasser again blockaded the Suez Canal to Israeli shipping and reinstituted the naval blockade at the mouth of the Tiran Straits.

This in turn led, in 1967, to the hasty withdrawal of the U.N. buffer force that had been in place to prevent further Egyptian aggression against Israel.  U.N. Secretary General U. Thant folded under Arab pressure and arbitrarily withdrew the buffer force.  Egyptian armed forces then entered the Sinai, heading for the Israeli border.

The Arab and Muslim world called then, just as now, for Israel’s extermination, and huge mobs in Arab capitals uttered lurid threats for Israel’s defeat and the slaughter of her people.  The world prepared for Israel’s destruction, but everyone was astonished when in June 1967, Israel — forced to fight a defensive war of survival — destroyed the combined Egyptian, Syrian, and Jordanian armies and air forces within six days.

The Suez Canal and the Straits of Tiran were again open for the free passage of Israeli ships.  Nasser fell from power and was replaced by Anwar Sadat.  However, in 1973, the Syrian and Egyptian armies attacked Israel on the holiest day in the Jewish religious calendar, Yom Kippur, which gave its name to the war.

Israel was hard put to survive initially, but she gradually beat back the Arab threat.  Sadat eventually decided that war was not an option for the time being and chose to make peace with Israel.

Israel vacated the entire Sinai desert (95% of the territories Israel conquered) and gave up the oil-producing facilities it had developed at Abu Rodeis — all in return for a signed peace agreement with Egypt.  Jordan eventually followed Egypt’s decision, but both Arab nations maintained a frigid peace with the Jewish state.

Anwar Sadat was subsequently assassinated by members of the Muslim Brotherhood.  His successor was Hosni Mubarak, who, for the last thirty years, has kept control over the seething Egyptian masses and the volatile Arab street.

Now his thirty-year rule has been fatally undermined by U.S. President, Barack Hussein Obama, in a betrayal that is as astonishing as it is deplorable.

It is clear to any child that a new Egyptian regime will, if not immediately, be hijacked by the Muslim Brotherhood, which is now calling for Egypt to prepare itself again for war with Israel and for the blockading of the Suez Canal to American, Western, and Israeli shipping.  Obama is no fool; he engineered this.

So, thanks to President Obama, we are back to square one with an Islamic Egyptian regime poised to send Egypt’s massively armed army back into Sinai and towards the Israeli border with the aim of exterminating the Jewish state.  So much for “land for peace.”

But what economic turmoil would a new Egyptian Islamic closure of the Canal mean to the West?

It is estimated that slightly more than two million barrels of crude oil and refined petroleum products flow both north and south through the Suez Canal every day.

In 2009, for example, almost 35,000 ships transited the Suez Canal, and 10 percent were petroleum tankers.  Oil shipments from the Persian Gulf travel through the Canal primarily to European ports, but also to the United States.

Additionally, the Sumed Oil pipeline provides an alternative to the Suez Canal, transporting as much as 3 million barrels of crude oil from Saudi Arabia and several Gulf states.  It amounts to up to seven percent of Europe’s oil needs.  Since the violence erupted in Egypt, European oil prices have risen far more than they have in the United States.

If the Muslim Brotherhood, which was founded in 1928, takes over Egypt, it is more than likely that both the Canal and the pipeline would be shut again, causing oil tankers to travel around the Cape of Good Hope, adding six thousand miles to the journey to Europe alone.  Not what an economically strapped Europe wants.

At the same time, the Brotherhood, now governing over 80 million Egyptians and possessing a huge military, would join with a radicalized Yemen in blockading the Bab al Mandeb straits at the foot of the Red Sea. [see map above]

Add to the noxious mix the Islamic Republic of Iran, and we may well see the closure of the Gulf of Oman [see map above], with additional disruptions of oil shipments to the West. The economic reality for America will be catastrophic.

Under Obama’s watch, the true democratic revolution against the mullahs in Iran was snuffed out because the American president refused to support the demonstrators in the streets of Tehran.  In contrast, the same Obama ordered Hosni Mubarak to leave office and let the rioters in Cairo have “free” elections.

Following Condoleezza Rice’s naïve call for “free” and democratic elections in Gaza, a branch of the Muslim Brotherhood (Hamas) used the democratic process to come to power and immediately trashed all semblance of democracy by instituting oppressive sharia law and raining thousands of missiles upon Israeli towns and villages.

The grotesque policies of Obama have caused Lebanon to fall under Islamic occupation, with the Iranian puppet, Hezb’allah, now controlling the Lebanese government.  Jordan’s kinglet, Abdullah, sits on a powder keg whereby his throne is under increasing pressure from violent members of the same Muslim Brotherhood.

So there you have it.  Islam increasingly holds Europe, America, and what is left of the free world in its clutches…and the left cheers it on.

Let me close with the words of Michael D. Evans, New York Times bestselling author of Jimmy Carter: The Liberal Left and World Chaos:

It’s no coincidence that Al Baradei showed up in Cairo only two days after the uprising began and was immediately named a negotiator by the Muslim Brotherhood. In fact, he had been waiting in the wings for quite a while.

He’s on the board of an organization headed by George Soros and Zbigniew Brzezinski called International Crisis Group. Brzezinski is the same man who supervised the fall of the Shah of Iran in 1979.

Another board member of the ICC is one Javier Solana. Solana is one of the most powerful figures in the European Union. Because of Solana’s Marxist sympathies, and his support for the regime of Cuba’s Fidel Castro, Solana was on the USA’s subversive list.

Former U.S. National Security Advisor, Sandy Berger, who once smuggled incriminating documents out of the Clinton White House [ed.’s note: the documents were smuggled out of the National Archives] by hiding them in his clothing, is another Board Member, as is General Wesley Clark, once fired from his NATO command.

Mohamed El Baradei also sits on the ICC’s Board [until his return to Egypt last month] and thus, seeing the hand of George Soros along with the other players who for so long have plotted against the West and Israel, the Islamists are joined together.”

What, one wonders, will history say of the foreign policies of Barack Hussein Obama?

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